RICHARD STRILOWICH

RICHARD STRILOWICH

Judith Barr has helped me to explore and heal areas in my inner-landscape where I had been stuck. She had a depth and inner wisdom allowing her to hone in on what is truly the root issue from early childhood and to communicate the truth of it in a compassionate and open-hearted manner such that I could hear without being defended. The depth of Judith’s presence has allowed me to feel safe enough to explore where I needed to.  In a group setting I have witnessed Judith speak in such a way that every person could personally relate to what was being presented and every person felt she was speaking and connected only to them.  I whole-heartedly recommend Judith for anyone looking to do their deep inner-work for healing what’s holding them back from living life to the fullest.

DIANNE H. DISSTON, LP, NCPsyA

DIANNE H. DISSTON, LP, NCPsyA

Judith Barr is a teacher and therapist of the highest caliber with an ability to gently reach into the tender inner world of her students and clients allowing them to feel into their inner life and safely explore and bring to awareness experiences and feelings that have been tucked away.

As a participant in a recent money workshop with Judith, I began to understand on a much deeper level what my relationship with money is and how that relationship is a product of having transferred my early relationships with my parents onto my relationship with money.  Understanding this brings feelings from your unconscious into your awareness where you can then process and heal your self and reach your greatest potential.

NOAH RUBINSTEIN, LMFT

NOAH RUBINSTEIN, LMFT

Judith is a gifted and conscious healer who brings to her work a big heart, a clear and focused mind, and great awareness & care to the therapeutic relationship. An engaging and thought provoking speaker, Judith offers profound wisdom and deep insight into how our past experiences and early decisions can shape lives, for better and for worse, and without grandiosity, how therapy can change the world. As an advocate for therapists becoming conscious of their use of power, Judith “walks the talk” – her therapy work demonstrates her clear sense of ethics, selflessness, and sensitivity to the power differential. Judith is one of those rare therapists with the experience and skill to safely guide a person into the abyss and back again, achieving great healing and change.

DOROTHY MCCARTY, LPC CONNECTICUT

DOROTHY MCCARTY, LPC CONNECTICUT

Thank you, again, for giving us such a wonderful workshop. Everyone loved it. You are truly captivating! That’s the word I have been searching for all day. You had everyone’s attention – and more! If you ever want to come back and do “part 2” as the woman said, we’d love to have you.

BILJANA OGNENOVA

BILJANA OGNENOVA

Thank you for the precious and inspiring event. It made me and my colleagues from work reflect on what bullying is in a fresh way . . . a different way . . . It was even more to think about than the previous, similar web conference ”There is a Bully in All of Us” where I first came into contact with your work . . .
I was truly amazed at the depth of the definition of bullying that you refer to. What most struck me, of course, was the name: “There is a Bully in All of Us”.

Wait a minute, I thought . . . an unpleasant thought crossed my mind . . . it would mean that there is a bully in me too!

It was a quite non-digestible personal responsibility at first . . . Until then, I had only perceived the phenomenon outside me . . . But later, after listening to the conference, reading through your articles and your other work the tricky truth about the use and abuse of power became more and more obvious to me.

It meant that I would need to take care of my “inner bully” rather than take care of bullies “outside me”. It meant constant awareness on how I use aggression and power . . . It meant greater clarity on what triggers my pain and why is this so . . . It also meant continuous questioning of what is the way of love and what is the way of adversity . . .

I had to slow down and think about the boundaries of my own power. I had to think about how I feed conflict and I had to think about my language and my thoughts of violence . . . It just affirmed what I thought I knew before – that hurt can easily turn into anger.

What is most important, turning inwards to look for the bully within made me realize that I have learned to make a home for it . . . How much of what I say and do can be bullying . . . and how I have allowed and given meaning to something to hurt me . . .

I am so grateful that I have been given the opportunity to learn again . . .

JOHN L. THEODORE, PH.D.

JOHN L. THEODORE, PH.D.

Ms. Barr, I want to thank you for presenting your guest talk of “Transference: A Treasure in Disguise” at the meeting of the New York State Mental Health Counselors Association (NYMHCA) – Westchester Chapter. We are used to having speakers present their areas of expertise in counseling at our chapter meetings. However, your talk was particularly memorable because of the level of engagement it elicited among our group members.

From the beginning of your talk, the content, coupled with your enthusiasm and presentation style, captured the full attention of our group members. Your words about transference truly embodied the heart of therapeutic interaction. In discussing transference, it was clear that you enabled our group members to think about, feel and experience the topic. It was a pleasure to hear you speak at our meeting, and I am grateful that you chose Westchester NYMHCA as a venue to present your professional expertise.

SYLVIA BRINTON PERERA

SYLVIA BRINTON PERERA

Using Hans Andersen’s fairy tale about the emperor whose vanity lands him naked on parade, Judith Barr explores the stories of many kinds of power. While her accounts are mainly focused on power abuse in families and the helping professions, we know only too well how the same dynamics surround us. In politics, in the corporate world, in church institutions, even in our news sources, we can see many forms of abuse that distort reality, silence questioning, crush empathy, and build empires based on greed, power, and righteous self-aggrandizement.

Because Judith Barr’s parables are enjoyable and deceptively simple, they help to raise consciousness in non-threatening ways. They creep under our defenses to wake us up. Thus they can be used by parents, family therapists, pastoral counselors, and group leaders in their work. They can also be used for self-reflection, for it is not hard to find aspects of ourselves mirrored in them.

I would also like to see this book as mandatory reading for politicians and CEOs. Everyone claiming authority needs to know the dire consequences to self and to others of the power shadow. When we are not aware, we may find ourselves parading our grandeur and goodness as foolishly as the naked emperor, or as cruelly as any tyrant.

ROGER WOOLGER

ROGER WOOLGER

This is the best book on power and its abuse by therapists and spiritual leaders since Guggenbuhl-Craig’s trenchant Power in the Helping Professions. Anyone whose therapy or discipleship has gone rotten through no fault of their own will find wisdom and comfort here. It should be required reading for all therapists and healers in training.

ALEXANDRA POPE

ALEXANDRA POPE

Power is wonderful and it has a dark underbelly. In Power Abused, Power Healed Judith Barr reveals the many ways that we can abuse it, often in the guise of helping others. A sobering and thoughtful read, this book will lead you on a wiser path to handling your power, and the possibility to create a more equitable and kinder world.

FRANK MARTIN DON

FRANK MARTIN DON

Drawing upon the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale of ‘The Emperor’s New Clothes’, Judith Barr has provided a perceptive and insightful work on the myriad of human experiences by which power is abused and the individual disempowered.  Not only does she address the issue of power abuse and how that power abuse becomes engrained as an individual’s life pattern. As importantly, if not more so, she offers human interest experiences as to how such abuse can be healed.  The great beauty of this book lies in the voice of the author — nonjudgmental, supportive, caring and providing the ways by which the individual heals their power and regains their soul.  This book is an extraordinary book and highlights the extraordinary work of Judith Barr, a person who through her lifetime has wisely counseled, lovingly supported and adeptly offered the tools by which the individual can heal their wounds and regain their power.  Brava! Judith Barr.